July 19, 2007

Great feedback!

Posted in classroom library, lesson plans, reading workshops at 9:10 pm by mrsmauck

Thanks so much for the great comments on my last post! Here are my thoughts on reading workshops now:

So I’ll have between 75 and 100 students in my five English classes (My other period will be for Newspaper and Yearbook), and only 30-40 books in my classroom library. (This is how many books I have now, plus about 10 I just ordered from amazon.) How do I help students choose books when they have to go to the library?

I really like Jennie‘s idea of having students do some sort of weekly response to their books. However, I’m wondering how I can have students juggle a day of reading workshop and a weekly writing assignment for that, a day of writing workshop, with various writing assignments for that, and the textbook curriculum. I’m working in a poverty-zone school, where academics take a back seat to sports and everyday survival in many cases, so I want to keep outside-of-school reading and homework to a bare minimum.

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2 Comments »

  1. Redkudu said,

    For helping students choose books:

    You (or your students, if you have internet access) can keep a watch on sites like Teen Ink or Flamingnet where teens review books they’ve read:

    http://teenink.com/Books/

    http://www.flamingnet.com/

    Then they’ll know what books are out there, and what other teens think of them.

  2. Becky said,

    If I understand your question correctly, then having the students “juggle” the workshops shouldn’t be too difficult. I know nothing about the Oklahoma standards (or what’s required in high school, for that matter!) but what I’m planning to do in my 4th grade classroom is to spend Monday and Tuesday covering the skills in the textbook curriculum, then Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday applying those skills in Readers’ Workshop. Does this sound like something that might work for you (or that could be adjusted to fit your class)?

    Again, I know nothing about high school textbook curricula, etc., so this note might be a complete waste of time, but I hope this helps a little bit!


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